lowbrowculture collects stories and ideas from John Kelly

Hello Hugo

Last week, I began the process of moving this site from Jekyll to Hugo. Jekyll is great. Really great, actually. It was my first real experiment with static sites and it was really fun and taught me a lot. But I’ve been starting to feel its limits. I pumped in everything from the past iterations of my blog, through Wordpress and Tumblr, leaving me with over 1,400 posts. So building the site with Jekyll each time I wanted to update it was slowwwww. Jekyll’s other big draw – its GitHub integration is amazing – is great if you’re hosting your site there. But I’m not. I’m self-hosting. So I started looking at Hugo.

I also had a look at Middleman, which has some impressive names using it, but was just a deeply unpleasant experience as an end-user1.

So for funtimes, I wanted to see how long it would take a fresh, vanilla install of the three most popular static site generators – Jekyll, Middleman and Hugo – to render the 1,400+ individual markdown files that make up this blog.

Jekyll
35.35 real 31.04 user 2.50 sys

middleman
22.47 real 30.61 user 3.97 sys

hugo
8.12 real 8.96 user 1.45 sys

It’s hard to argue with this kind of performance improvement, but what sealed the deal was the fact they include a built-in hugo import jekyll command that can get you started migrating your site across. I had my entire site migrated across in less than an hour.


  1. Middleman feels as if it’s been written for robots and not humans. To build your site in Jekyll, you type jekyll build, which is easy to remember. To build it in Hugo, you just type hugo, which is almost impossible to forget. To build your site in MM, you type bundle exec middleman build, which yes, is easy enough to remember after you’ve done it a couple of times but my God, it’s so clunky and basically tells you everything you need to know about what it’s like to use Middleman. [return]

Versioning, Licensing, and Sketch 4.0 →

It seems like we’re moving to the world where app subscription models are the norm and I’m worried about what this means for the future of some of my favourite apps. In December, YNAB announced it was moving to a web-based, subscription model. In January, it was forced to change its strategy a little in the face of a severely negative response.

But the Sketch model seems like a pretty great compromise. Buy a license and you’ll receive a year’s worth of free upgrades. After that, no more upgrades (besides bug-fix upgrades) but your software will continue to work. This seems like a really clever and consumer-friendly way of addressing this problem.

The Trailers for Ghostbusters (2016) and the Art of Editing Comedy →

Tony Zhou (of the excellent Every Frame a Painting) takes a look at the difference between the US and UK trailers for the new Ghostbusters and how a few frames can make all the difference between a joke that hits and a joke that lands.

Interview With Lacey Noonan →

Boston.com’s interview with Lacey Noonan, self-publishing superstar and author of niche erotica like I Don’t Care If My Best Friend’s Mom is a Sasquatch, She’s Hot and I’m Taking a Shower With Her Because It’s the New Millennium and its sequel I Don’t Care if My Sasquatch Lover Says the World is Exploding, She’s Hot But I Play Bass and There’s Nothing Hotter Right Now Than Rap-Rock Because It’s the New Millennium.

BDC: Do your friends and family know you write these novels, or is it private? You mention your husband in your bio, Does he know?

Lacey: My husband knows. Some friends know. That’s about it. He actually helped with some of the finer football details in the Gronkalish book. But I am the heat commander. I control the boners.

This lady is amazing.

A Brief History of John Baldessari

Four little words that guarantee I’ll drop whatever I’m doing to make time for: “narrated by Tom Waits”.

John Baldessari was Tumblr before the internet was ever a thing, and this is a terrific introduction.

Drop whatever you’re doing and make time for this.

Ta-Nehisi Coates on Writing

This is so good. And I feel like a lot of what Ta-Nehisi Coates says in this video is applicable to any sort of creative work.

Let's Play: The Shining →

Pippin Barr’s note-perfect recreation of The Shining as an 8-bit game.

Mattel Update the ThingMaker as a 3D Printer →

Cheap, easy to use, surprisingly decent resolution. I think I’m going to be picking one up myself. For my kid, of course.

Wyclef Jean Does an AMA, Gets Destroyed →

I’ve never seen an AMA go so badly that the celebrity answered nothing and deleted their reddit account. Example question:

Are you the same guy that started a charity for his country then stole that money?

The Art of the Witness →

The Witness is a frustrating game. Not just because the puzzles are hard, but because the game demands so much of your time (I’ve spent hours on individual puzzles) and because the world hints at so much but appears to deliver (from where I’m standing, at least) so little apart from more puzzles for you to bash your head against. So it’s nice to step back and just appreciate the beauty of the world they created.